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Andy Henry. In memoriam
Barnacle Goose.

Historical Victorian Taxidermy

"Purchasing Britain's taxidermy heritage"
Andy Henry. In memoriam
Barnacle Goose.

Victorian

Rowland Ward
Peter Spicer
James Hutchings

Bill Cox of Liverpool

James Gardner

Thomas Edward Gunn
Thomas Jefferies
A.S.Hutchinson
H T Shopland
J Cullingford
Walter Potter
Carl Ethan Akeley
Abraham Dee Bartlett
John James Audubon
John Gould
William Borrer
Henry Murray
Scottish Taxidermy
Norfolk Taxidermy
H Shaw of Shrewsbury
Mountney of Cardiff
Farren of Cambridge
White of Salisbury
Bazeley of Northampton
Williams of Dublin
Great Auk taxidermy
Swaysland of Brighton
J.A.Cole of Norwich
Lowne of Great Yarmouth
George Bristowe

Historical

Charles Darwin
Taxidermy Trade Labels
Stereoviews of Taxidermy
Victorian Taxidermy
Edwardian Taxidermy
The Great Exhibition of 1851
Passenger Pigeon
Countdown to Extinction
Richard Lydekker F.R.S.

Modern

AJ Armitstead
David Keningale
Modern Taxidermy
Reproduction Eggs
How to complete a case

Collections

Four Elms Collection Four Elms Collection II
Booth
Booth II

Booth III

Booth IV

Ogilvie Collection
Ogilvie I Collection
Ogilvie II Collection
Ogilvie III Collection

Gallery

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TaxidermyGallery2
TaxidermyGallery3
TaxidermyGallery4
TaxidermyGallery5
TaxidermyGallery6
TaxidermyGallery7
TaxidermyGallery8
TaxidermyGallery9
TaxidermyGallery10
TaxidermyGallery11
TaxidermyGallery12
Taxidermy Trade Labels
Bass Rock Scotland
Taxidermy Birds

American

Taxidermy in America
Taxidermy in America II
Taxidermy in America III
Chicago Natural History Museum

Restoration

Taxidermy Restoration
Housekeeping

Value

UK Taxidermy Price Index

Fish

Fish Taxidermy

Mammals

Mammals
Trophies/Games Mounts

Articles

Taxidermy Forums
Museums
Guilds
UK Taxidermists
Taxidermy Articles
Taxidermy Dealers
Taxidermy Suppliers
Hunting
Fishing
Field Sports

Law

Taxidermy Law

Links

Taxidermy Links

Wanted

Taxidermy Wanted
Limits of Liability

We are a group of the UK's largest and most dedicated collectors. We are always seeking to purchase only quality items of Victorian and Modern taxidermy. The site was launched August 2004 and is the best resource on the internet for the History of British Taxidermy, given the number of taxidermists represented. No other internet site has the same level of detail and content. Not a boast just a simple fact.

Ducks
Now there are Hutchings collectors and there are Hutchings collectors. This chap is perhaps the largest. These images are just a sample of what is in the collection. Most people do not have 40 cases by Hutchings let alone 44 foxes by one person. Also an additional 33 cases of foxes by other makers, so nearly 100 in total. Add that to the additional 1200 other quality cases and this is quiet a collection. That said we are always interested in buying more of the same. Just click on the Dragon below to see more images.

Featured Taxidermy page on this site

"The Welsh Room".

TAXIDERMY ITEMS WANTED. Please respond via this on-line form HERE with a description of what you have for sale.

www.Historical-Taxidermy.co.uk/.com

So if you are seeking to purchase quality taxidermy, sell quality taxidermy or have it valued for auction house disposal, then go to this site. This site is dedicated to collectors dealing solely with collectors. This site has been significantly updated so worth a visit.

British Historical Taxidermy for sale.


TAXIDERMY ITEMS WANTED. Please respond via this on-line form HERE with a description of what you have for sale.

If you have items for sale then please email the address below:

Email: Enquiries@taxidermy4cash.com

Contained within this site are over 7113 individual images of Victorian and Modern taxidermy and taxidermy related material, located on some 189 individual pages. The most comprehensive website dedicated to Taxidermy. We will buy everything of quality you have for sale, no exceptions. To coin a phrase made recently, we collect dead people's dead things. We have,as the UK's largest resource, extensive / comprehensive knowledge of this subject which enables us ensure that the prices offered are both fair and accurate. Our price database of some 1700 plus quality "named" cases sold privately and at auction over the last 7 years ensures that our offers to purchase or to simply value are very realistic and reflect the current market trends. Now it has been an interesting 16 months or so, so apologies for not updating this site as much as normal. Still lots to report both now and in the future. We got a little distracted with the Museums Association, still that discussion will be set to continue and continue, as the majority of people we engaged with were disgusted at the outcome. All the best (wink).

Just updated the taxidermy value page on the site. Despite bonkers prices being paid for junk, the average price only rose by 27.00 per case to 478.00. Word of advice when bidding on the phone, the cases look much better in the photos!!!!!!!. Have a look.

Just a FYI, Dr David Fleming OBE, director of National Museums Liverpool, remember him???. He's the one who lost out on the Echalaz collection going to to a shed in Essex. A collection of regional importance to Liverpool and National Museums Liverpool with millions of visitors a year. Anyway he now sits on the ethics committe board of the Museums Association, which we can only assume is a good thing for unlikely future divestments of public property.

New images /information.

The Pennington Collection.

Bob Ellis Taxidermy.

European Red Fox.

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Moorhen by Yours truly. I put this image up to show the work in various stages. Some taxidermists prefer to bind the feathers using cotton, but this restricts your ability to groom the specimen as it dries. Once dried the pins, wire, and card are removed. drying can take around 3-7-10 days depending on the specimen. Then the specimen requires painting to put back those colours that fade when the animal died. It is also interesting to note that with the exception of Mick Gadd and Carl Church, all the other "taxidermy bookie wookies" are written by those who do not undertake taxidermy. Strange really to profess about a subject you haven't done.

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English Partridge by Yours truly.

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English Partridge by Tony Armitstead, perhaps the finest taxidermist in the North East.

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Herring Gull chicks and reproduction egg by Yours truly.

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Perch by John Cooper dated 1902.

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Gooseander by Robert Duncan.

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Barn Owl by Peter Spicer.

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Otter with prey by John Cooper.

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Dark phase Tawny Owl by me. Decided to leave 1 pin for the photo to demonstrate it is a taxidermied bird.

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Dark phase Tawny Owl by me. Completed case. The case is 3 sided glass and just under 3 feet tall, 2 feet wide. Impressive work, not for sale.

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Dark phase Tawny Owl by me. Completed case.

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Arctic Skua by me.

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Kingfishers by TE Gunn.

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White Muntjac Deer. Not an albino by an interesting variation. Incredibly rare.

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Common Carp by Homer.

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White Pheasant by Peter Spicer.

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Pair of Pike by Lowne of Great Yarmouth.

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Pair of Pheasants by Rowland Ward.

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Thomas Salkeld, who trained under Henry Murray.

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Barbel by Rowland Ward.

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Lady Amhurst's Pheasants. Attractive and large case.

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Duck Billed Platypus by Rowland Ward.

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Seabird case by H Murray of Carnforth.

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Black Grouse by Shaw.

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Very nice example of a victorian Ring Ouzel.

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Buzzard by Peter Spicer up for auction dated 12th December 2013 at Holts Auctioneers. Sold for 850.00 which is a surprise as we thought it was rather ugly.

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Long Eared Owl by Tony Armitstead.

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European Jay.

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European Jay.

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Giraffe floating by Simon Wilson, taxidermist to the rich and famous.

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Little Tern and chicks by Charles Thorpe.

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Cormorant by Rowland Ward.

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Rifle bird by Ashmead in a dome.

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Black tailed Godwit completed case. Hours of work and certainly not for sale. Some people maintain that taxidermy is just about the bird or mammal. They are wrong!.

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Fulmar case complete with chick.

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Fulmar case complete with chick.

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Fulmar case complete with chick.

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Re-worked Guillemott cases with replica eggs.

Kendal Museum

Apparently an extreamly well attended event with some 130 participants, some "club" members were in the audience toooooo. Carl Church exhibits were thoroughly enjoyed and the events, including the auction of specific items and prizes was a complete success. This could potenitally be a blueprint for other museums around the country to follow this example of raising awareness. The Dodo theme seems to be a winning formula. Well done Mr Church for your efforts in promoting the Dodo exhibit.

.

Kendal Museum

NEWS: Kendal Museum with the assistence of Mr Carl Church are creating The Dodo Exhibition. Also showcasing his work is Luke Williams of Staffordshire Skeletons. This exhibition is to run from July 4th until October 2013. Erroll Fuller, a leading authority on British Historical Taxidermy and the life of the Dodo and Sir David Attenborough have supported this undertaking. Well done Mr Sailor for his contribution to the events, namely his book documenting the Echalaz collection and how it came to be donated to the people of Liverpool.

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Dodo and Skeleton on display at Kendal Museum.

http://www.kendalmuseum.org.uk/what's_on_130502_great_dodo_exhibition.php

Apparently well worth a visit. Professor Carl G Jones MBE will open the event and hold a talk on the Mauritian Wildlife Foundation, the importance of the Dodo in history and recent projects he has worked on to save endangered species. What is evident is the absence of..............??? certain people. Perhaps the issues of the last year may have had an impact. Anyway, moving on.

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No need to add any further comment to that stated above. We understand that Proffessor Pat Morris (retired -Holloway) is the chairman of the trust mentioned.

Source of the quote above was an Academic paper produced by Dr J Freedman for NatSCA. The Natural Sciences Collections Association (NatSCA) is the UK's organisation for representing Natural Science Collections and associated museum staff, and for communicating all relevant developments and news pertaining to that purpose. They exist to promote natural sciences collections and their use and care, and our aims include acting as an advocate, providing training, and promoting best practice within the network of their colleagues and affiliated institutions.

http://www.plymouth.gov.uk/freedman_undertaking_review_nathistcoll_natscanews.pdf

Interestingly Dr Freedman was not involved in any of the discussions that took place in 2011-12.
It is also worthwhile remebering that although Liverpool Museum were consulted (They were the only other museum involved seeking to acquire), they were only made aware of the horrendous / digusting developments after members of the public and the press informed them at the 11th hour when most of the decisions had already been made. The MA did not inform Liverpool of the disposal at the time of the decisions being made by Sefton Council, so Mr Freedman is right to observe what he has in his report.


If however you wish to complain about public property being given away from or by museums currently and in the future, please then write to the following people.

Mr Mark Taylor is a director of the Museums Association

Mr Alan Davey is the Chief Executive Officer of the Arts Coucil.

Both can be contact by email and both are aware of current views and developments.

Disgusting / vile undertakings. How can National Museums Liverpool with over 2million visitors per year, not be the recipients of a publicly owned collection (Echalaz collection) of regional importance. It lost out to a shed (Village of Rayne in Essex) that is not accessible by the general public. Seem logical to you????. Also how can The Museums Association, of which National Museums Liverpool being a board member, think is was "a good idea" to allow this to happen. Questions clearly are still being asked (2 million visitors verses a shed in Essex!!!!), as this vile issue has not gone away so to speak, with more and more objecting to this less than transparent vile undertaking."

Controversial Developments with the public property of Museums being given away (valuable taxidermy by famous naturalists), despite austere economic times and job losses in the public sector.

Following on from the disposal of the Echalaz collection there is now an official enquiry by the Arts Council and a review is ongoing. There is also and additional investigation by the Ethics Committee of the Museums Assocaition to look into whether the disposal of the collections was undertaken in the appropriate fashion. The Arts Council decision is pending and the Museums Association reports back in September 2012 when it has completed it's investigation into why the rules and regulations were not followed. This followed objections from several musuems around the country directly, Natural History Curators around the UK, the media and concerned members of the general public as to the manner of the disposal. Please see dedicated page to this issue as detailed below or Google this subject and you can read all about it from the information in the public domain already specific to this issue.
A group of dedicated objectors are now awaiting the decision of the MA and Arts Council. MA's position will be published in September 2012. National Museums Liverpool wanted the collections but were only informed after the decision was made to move the collections from public ownership.
Sadly National Museums Liverpool were not informed with sufficient time to do anything meaningful to retain these collections for the people of Liverpool. They were owned by the people of Liverpool and therefore public property prior to merely being given away and relocated to Essex, where they have no historical importance or relevance and most likely will never been seen again. Potentially, one or two badly restored cases perhaps.

The Echalaz Bird Collection. Notes on controversial disposal of public property.

If however you wish to complain about public property being given away from or by museums currently and in the future, please then write to the following people.

Mr Mark Taylor is a director of the Museums Association

Mr Alan Davey is the Chief Executive Officer of the Arts Coucil.

Both can be contact by email and both are aware of current views and developments.

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Snipe by John Cooper.

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Little Stints by Cullingford.

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Fox head by Barry Williams

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Badgers head by Barry Williams

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New Taxidermy book by Alexis Turner, to be launched in May this year. Having spoken to Alexis today there has been a fantastic response to this punblication even prior to launch. How many books can be written on this subject??????. It appears still more to come. This book has got the balance right being image rich (over 300 images to peruse) and of superb quality which is reflected in some 30,000 copies already been reserved. Another example of how to do a publication properly. Add that to the 57,000 sold by Errol Fuller and well................

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Not strictly taxidermy but, worthy of note from authorities in this field. Errol Fuller and Sir David Attenborough. From the moment Europeans were introduced to the birds of paradise in the early sixteenth century, their unique beauty was recognized and commemorated in the first name that they were given - birds so beautiful they must be from paradise. Originally they were thought not to have legs and therefore never to land. It is also refreshing to read a well research and beautifully presented piece of work. Available on-line and also from quality bookstores. Errol Fuller, perhaps the UK's authority on victorian natural history and victorian taxidermy, has a global reputation for his books on extinction and extinct species, as well as an artist and collector of natural history material. He is passionate about the Birds of Paradise. Also in terms of co-authour it doesn't get better than Mr Attenborough does it?. Certainly a cut above the rest.

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This case of Kestrel by Peter Spicer made 1600 at auction this week, further enforcing the belief that prices continue to fall.

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Interesting document detailing the death of John Duncan aged 71.

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Painting by one of finest victoriann taxidermists John Duncan. This depicts an Osprey. This image was provide by a relative of the Duncan family in Newcastle.

A new page dedicated to the work of Frederick Ernest Gunn has been launched. This collection is housed at the Haslemere Museum

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House Sparrows in detail by FE Gunn.

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Case drawings by FM Ogilvie from his personal collection of British Birds. Here is a Red Necked Grebe. This images shows a subtle use of colour also. For a more comprehensive review of his drawings then have a look at the page dedicated to this. We have all the case drawings, notes and correspondence, but suggest that you visit the museum where the collection is housed.

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This has to be perhaps the finest Arctic Fox display we have seen. Less is indeed more.

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Polecats by H Brazenor of Stockport. Used to think this was a fake, despite paying a hugue sum for it. You know the expression, too good to be true???. Limited fading of the mustelids by example?. That said until reported by Morris in latest book (2010) that said person actually took breath. Case is rather delightful and pleased to confirm that Mr Brazenore did exist by Morris. Case not for sale so "cost" is pretty irrelevant. Never have been able to take a decent image of it.

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Following a theme of extinction at the moment, here is a male Labrador duck. Few examples of these ducks exist. Good example of a species eaten into extinction.

Pat Morris's book entitled simply " A History of Taxidermy"
Was launched yesterday by Mike Gadd on his new website, please see this link. Competitively priced although higher on other websites we note. Order your copy now, by following this link in your web-browser and view the flyer and purchase a book.

Historical Taxidermy book for sale by Pat Morris.


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" A History of Taxidermy". This book is available now to purchase, following a conversation with Mike today. Just follow the link and order away so to speak, you will not be dissapointed. Just follow the link above and order direct from the author. The link on Mike's website goes striaght to Mr Morris for instant dispatch.

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Modern Merganser chick.

In Addition

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We have noticed another "rash" of items appearing from "sadly" broken cases. Clearly people have slippery / greasy little fingers (don't people wash these days). To that end and always as part of the service we have enclosed a useful images that shows the correct way to lift boxes or cases (LOL) as a way to ensure these accidents don't occur.

Latest 69 modern and historical taxidermy pages within this site

Updated this week items on the new to the site, Pennington Collection.

European Red Fox.

Museum Style cases.

Herring Gull Chicks.

Spicer Whooper Swan

TE Gunn II.

Red Grouse . F.M.Ogilvie case drawings Exotics. Puffins..

New Zealand Huia. New Tony Armitstead page. The Haslemere Museum collection. Northern Fulmar.

James Hutchings II. Kiwi. Rowland Ward II.. Oystercatcher nest scene.

Jackdaw (Corvus monedula). Bird Sketches. Modern day masterpieces. "The Welsh Room II".

George Herd 1876-1926 Historical taxidermy data. William Farren, Pied Wheatear. Peter Spicer & Sons Peregrine Falcons.

The Dodo. Museum Quality victorian taxidermy. Fred Sanders, Islington. European Bird Taxidermy.

H.N.Pashley of Cley. TE Gunn's watercolour. John Cooper & Sons II. Great Bustard.

Shellbrooke of Brignorth. Red-Throated Diver. Rowland Ward Ephemera. Peter Spicer & Sons.

Ephemera. "Little America". "3 Little Kittens who have lost their mittens" Carrion Crow & Moorhen.

Common Guillemot. Charles Thorpe. Van Ingen of Mysore. Antique case restorations.

James Millar / Collection dispersement service. Eskimo Curlew. More Peter Spicer. "Tasmanian Wolf,", now extinct.

W.Barnes, Islington. Charles Waterton Hooded Mergansers. John Bisop Murray.

The Californian Condor. The Gainsford Hall disposal 1985. The Hart-Hall disposal 1982 F Lawrence & Co, Leeds.

F.M.Ogilvie. Anthropomorphic taxidermy. Sir Richard Owen. 1935 Record Trout by John Cooper & Sons.

WF Homer of Forest Gate, London Gerrard's of London. Trophy Heads. Soul in the Skin.

The Welsh Room III. "The Written Word". UK Taxidermy price index. Malloch of Perth.

Additional 77 Featured Historical Taxidermy pages within this site from the 188 pages packed within information on this subject making it the most comprehensive globally.

Taxidermy chicks. Darwin Museum, Moscow. Historical Images Dioramas.

UK Bird Taxidermy. Hooded Crows. John Cooper Birds The Echalaz Bird Collection.

The Climmers. Plume Hunters. Walter Lowne George Bristow.

Henry Shaw, taxidermist. The Great Auk. Williams of Dublin Mountney of Cardiff.

Swaysland of Brighton. White of Salisbury. Farren of Cambridge. Bazeley of Northampton.

A.J.Armitstead, taxidermist. Mr Eric Gorton, Bird Artist North Atlantic Long tail Duck Velvet Scoter / Guillemots

Eider Ducks / Goldeneye North Atlantic Scoters The Ogilvie Bird Collection The Ogilvie Bird Collection

The Ogilvie Bird Collection The Ogilvie Bird Collection Barry Williams, taxidermist DELETED. North Atlantic King Eider

Harlequin Ducks John Cooper & Sons Duck Hunting Caddo, Lake Ringneck Ducks

Pratt & Sons of Brighton Pratt & Sons of Brighton Richard Lydekker 1849-1915 William Thomas Cox

Norfolk Taxidermists Mr Elmer Oxley Carl Ethan Akeley Charles Darwin

Rowland Ward "Naturalist" Abraham Dee Bartlett Tazmanian Tiger, extinct. Four Elms Collection

Four Elms Collection II Thomas Edward Gunn Reproduction Eggs Victorian Taxidermy

Taxidermy Trade Labels Taxidermy Wanted Passenger Pigeon James Hutchings of Aberystwyth

Peter Spicer Taxidermy Edward Thomas Booth Fish Taxidermy John Gould "Bird Man"

James Gardner Walter Potter Scottish Taxidermy Henry Murray

AS Hutchinson Thomas Jefferies Mammal Taxidermy Chicago Field Museum

TAXIDERMY ITEMS WANTED. Please respond via this on-line form HERE with a description of what you have for sale.

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European Polecat with prey by James Hutchings.

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We can be funny / obtuse toooooooo. This sums it up nicely for us.

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Victorian Dabchick by G W Quatremain of Malvern.

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Victorian European Curlew and chick, by Hodder "Presever of Birds and Animals" of North Street Clapham, London and not for sale. Very much in the style of James Hutchings, but by a Victorian London Taxidermist.

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A pair of Skylarks with 4 chicks preserved by Pratt of Brighton. This Taxidermists features prominently in the Booth Museum. The above case is the best Pratt of Brighton case I have ever seen in terms of attention to detail and the overall balance within what is a compact case. Pratt tended to produce large cases, which sometimes made the birds look a little lost.


Taxidermy Links.
Please double click on the Taxidermy link icon below.

Taxidermy Links

Victorian

Rowland Ward
Peter Spicer
James Hutchings

Bill Cox of Liverpool

James Gardner

Thomas Edward Gunn
Thomas Jefferies
A.S.Hutchinson
H T Shopland
J Cullingford
Walter Potter
Carl Ethan Akeley
Abraham Dee Bartlett
John James Audubon
John Gould
William Borrer
Henry Murray
Scottish Taxidermy
Norfolk Taxidermy
H Shaw of Shrewsbury
Mountney of Cardiff
Farren of Cambridge
White of Salisbury
Bazeley of Northampton
Williams of Dublin
Great Auk taxidermy
Swaysland of Brighton
J.A.Cole of Norwich
Lowne of Great Yarmouth
George Bristowe

Historical

Charles Darwin
Taxidermy Trade Labels
Stereoviews of Taxidermy
Victorian Taxidermy
Edwardian Taxidermy
The Great Exhibition of 1851
Passenger Pigeon
Countdown to Extinction
Richard Lydekker F.R.S.

Modern

AJ Armitstead
David Keningale
Modern Taxidermy
Reproduction Eggs
How to complete a case

Collections

Four Elms Collection Four Elms Collection II
Booth
Booth II

Booth III

Booth IV

Ogilvie Collection
Ogilvie I Collection
Ogilvie II Collection
Ogilvie III Collection

Gallery

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TaxidermyGallery7
TaxidermyGallery8
TaxidermyGallery9
TaxidermyGallery10
TaxidermyGallery11
TaxidermyGallery12
Taxidermy Trade Labels
Bass Rock Scotland
Taxidermy Birds

American

Taxidermy in America
Taxidermy in America II
Taxidermy in America III
Chicago Natural History Museum

Restoration

Taxidermy Restoration
Housekeeping

Value

UK Taxidermy Price Index

Fish

Fish Taxidermy

Mammals

Mammals
Trophies/Games Mounts

Articles

Taxidermy Forums
Museums
Guilds
UK Taxidermists
Taxidermy Articles
Taxidermy Dealers
Taxidermy Suppliers
Hunting
Fishing
Field Sports

Law

Taxidermy Law

Links

Taxidermy Links

Wanted

Taxidermy Wanted
Limits of Liability


This "website" has consulted with and has been critically reviewed by European Regulatory Authorities / Defra, monitoring the sale of taxidermy and representatives of the UK Guild Of Taxidermists to ensure that it complies with Current Guidance / Licencing on the ownership and display of Taxidermy Specimens here in the UK. You are more than welcome to check, the link(s) to Defra and The Guild's legal expert are located half way up this page and within the site in general. In so far as is both reasonable and practical, we understand that all the modern items of taxidermy shown on this site were are informed by their owners to have the appropriate licences and documentation. Sooooooo no need to go running as we are regular contact. Perhaps it is you that should be worried?.

With reference to "Modern" examples, those produced after 1947, we are interested in purchasing these also, but must have relevant and appropriate Defra and CITES licences, when appropriate. Cases without such information shall be declined. We suggest you make your own investigations in this area to avoid confusion.

Further information can be obtained at www.ukcites.gov.uk, www.defra.gov.uk/wildlife-countryside/index.htm and www.eu-wildlifetrade.org

Copyright
All image use or reproduction by any means from this site is expressly forbidden. Subsequently, the British Historical Taxidermy Society (BHTS), who incidentally pride themselves on their 'integrity' [sic], started taking images from this site and watermarking them as their own. Maybe not the best example on Internet etiquette. Because of this poor behaviour, from now on all images on this site are copyright of the people who provided them un-water nmarked and can only be used with their express permission in their original form.
Site was last updated: 17th April 2014.

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